IN THE March 2011 EDITION

The warship BNS Greenhalgh, the first Brazilian Navy ship to integrate in a US Navy strike group

Pictured: The warship BNS Greenhalgh, the first Brazilian Navy ship to integrate in a US Navy strike group, a former Royal Navy Type 22 frigate. It has seemed likely the UK will build new warships with Brazil, but the attitude of the South American country surely runs contrary to such joint ventures? See above. Photo: US Navy.

The March 2011 edition of WARSHIPS International Fleet Review - published February 25 - will be packed with news and analysis features on world naval events and emerging issues. It includes:

  • BRAZIL: UK’s FRIEND OR FOE? – It all seemed to promise so much, with the UK and rising South American naval power Brazil signing a defence co-operation treaty to look at running joint naval construction programmes. However a new president carried on the policy of banning British warships on the Falklands patrol from Brazilian ports. We consider the potential folly of building warships with a nation that is not always a reliable ally.
  • UNDER SEA TERROR THREAT – Leading maritime defence thinker Rear Admiral Chris Parry looks at the enduring threat of sub-surface terrorism and other similar means of asymmetric attack.
  • SOUTH AFRICAN SUB SCHOOL – A fascinating behind-the-scenes look at how the South African Navy creates submariners who have proved to be deadly practitioners of their dark arts.
  • UK DEFENCE GAMBLERS – The UK’s slash and burn Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) has taken enormous gambles by ditching maritime capabilities. However, the process of gambling with the UK’s maritime defence and security has been going on for years, starting in earnest during the Blair-Brown years.
  • FINLAND’S NAVAL CHIEF INTERVIEWED – The boss of a Baltic fleet explains the reasoning behind his force’s decision to explore new horizons.
  • MARITIME FORCES IN AFGHANISTAN 10 YEARS ON – With the tenth anniversary of 9-11 terrorist attacks approaching, we look at the on-going major commitment by the Royal Navy to Afghanistan. This spring the UK’s Naval Service is set to take the lead alongside maritime elements of the US Armed Forces, so an examination of where the intervention stands in 2011 is highly pertinent.
  • LIVE NAVY! – In the latest instalment of our look at some of the broader elements of naval life, we cover: Sail training for Australian youngsters; provide advice on how sailors and marines being made redundant from the RN can chart a new course; consider the top naval movies of all time; have a laugh with comedian Al Murray and a heroic Royal Marine combat veteran; tell the story of a remarkable web site that features naval family history.

Note: Contents subject to change.